Celebrating its heritage, Converse is ushering in a new era of technology, All Star Modern. The brand has released the All Star Modern, an updated iteration of a basketball shoe from 1920, on June 16. The shoe will be available in five colorways: black, action red, lucid green, soar blue and white.

Although the shoe boasts a classic look, its selling point is its updated technology, especially its Nike Hyperfuse construction. The process, in conjunction with a circular knit upper, TPU-fused overlaid toe cap, and neoprene split tongue and lining, dropped the shoe’s weight and made it more durable.

But Converse incorporating Nike technology into its silhouettes isn’t new; the Chuck II, which debuted last July, features Nike’s Lunarlon cushioning. And its relationship with Nike will become more prevalent in its footwear, with the brand confirming multiple silhouettes using technology from the Swoosh would arrive in stores this summer, aside from its iconic Chuck Taylor.

Bryan Cioffi, Converse’s VP and creative director of global footwear, said, “Nike technology gives the brand an unparalleled advantage over its competition. To take the best of current, modern standards of manufacturing and wrap that in timeless design ethos, it’s a unique proposition. I don’t think any footwear company could do it the way we can.”

 

The brand is also releasing two colorways of an HTM-designed limited edition high top iteration of the All Star Modern, the first non-Nike shoe designed by the famed trio of Hiroshi Fujiwara, Tinker Hatfield and Mark Parker.

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